The Persuasion Project: Chapters 7 and 8

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CE Brock illustration from mollands.net.

Welcome back to my live read of Persuasion. We’ve hit Chapter 7, and things are about to get kicked into high gear. How do we know? Look at this opening sentence!

A very few days more, and Captain Wentworth was known to be at Kellynch, and Mr Musgrove had called on him, and come back warm in his praise, and he was engaged with the Crofts to dine at Uppercross, by the end of another week.

Sigh!

Of course, their first meeting cannot smoothly come to pass, because what fun would that be? Anne is about to meet him at her sister’s in-laws’ until her oldest nephew is brought back to the house injured. Then the next night, everyone is going to dine at Uppercross with Captain Wentworth, Anne, naturally, being left behind to tend the recovering child. After all, why should Mary stay with her own child? As she says to Anne: “You, who have not a mother’s feelings, are a great deal the properest person.” Truly Mary is the worst, and cracks me up. But far more importantly—will Anne and Captain Wentworth ever meet?!

Well, yes, they will, the next morning when Captain Wentworth comes to shoot with Anne’s brother-in-law, Charles. What’s great about this is how brief and simple, and seemingly unexceptional the meeting is. It’s really only something Austen could pull off.

In two minutes after Charles’s preparation, the others appeared; they were in the drawing-room. Her eye half met Captain Wentworth’s, a bow, a curtsey passed; she heard his voice; he talked to Mary, said all that was right, said something to the Miss Musgroves, enough to mark an easy footing; the room seemed full, full of persons and voices, but a few minutes ended it. Charles shewed himself at the window, all was ready, their visitor had bowed and was gone.

And that’s all. We’ve waited six and a half chapters, and that is their reunion. Anne, unsurprisingly, is a bit flustered the rest of the morning, but there were no grand exchanges, no one fainted, it was all simply done and described in a beautifully understated manner. Frankly, this is another of those moments I adore in Austen. She doesn’t focus on the drama of the meeting, but Anne’s reaction to it, because it’s her internal life we actually care about.

The chapter then comes to an end with the narrator switching to Captain Wentworth’s thoughts on marriage. He is ready to marry any nice lady he meets, with the exception of Anne Elliot. He, in fact, does have a few criteria, all of which he has designed in reaction against Anne. But this cannot be the end of their story, can it?

Of course not.

Chapter 8 begins with the information that Anne and Captain Wentworth were constantly in the same circle after this time. And that is followed by many charming anecdotes about how everyone would ask him questions about the navy, which I find lovely, but I’m a dork for all things British navy in this era. The chapter, which covers a typical evening of supper and conversation, ends with dancing, Anne stationed at the piano, Captain Wentworth clearly unimpressed when he is told she never dances anymore. When he is later cold to her, she deems it by far the hardest moment of their reacquaintance.

And that’s those two chapters. Next up is arguably one of my favorite moments in all of literature. I think that should get me back to this reread in short order.

~S

The Persuasion Project: Chapter 6

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CE Brock illustration from mollands.net

 

It’s Persuasion Live Read time again! Chapter 6 opens with a nice bit of character building for Anne, but without a ton of plot happening during her stay with her sister, Mary Musgrove, at Uppercross Coattage. And even though things pick up a bit later on, I think I’m just going to pull some quotes that struck me. It’s as “live” as I can make my read. (Crazy thought—Read aloud with asides. Post audio.) Anyhow, here’s my favorite example of what Austen is doing in this chapter with Anne.

She played a great deal better than either of the Miss Musgroves, but having no voice, no knowledge of the harp, and no fond parents, to sit by and fancy themselves delighted, her performance was little thought of, only out of civility, or to refresh the others, as she was well aware. She knew that when she played she was giving pleasure only to herself; but this was no new sensation.

Just in case you were questioning whether or not Anne Eliot is a better person than you. Truly, she is always willing to be underappreciated, put everyone’s complaints and desires above her own. Is there any heroine who is so content to be unassuming without also coming across as spineless and unsympathetic? (I’m looking at you, Fanny Price. I’m looking at you.)

But then in the second half of the chapter, the Crofts arrive to take up residence at Kellynch. I immediately love Mrs. Croft when she comes to visit Anne and Mary at Uppercross Cottage.

Her manners were open, easy, and decided, like one who had no distrust of herself, and no doubts of what to do; without any approach to coarseness, however, or any want of good humour.

She’s entirely my kind of woman, and frankly, after all of the shallow, fake, and conniving people in Anne’s life, exactly the friend our heroine deserves. However, Mrs. Croft then nearly gives Anne a heart attack.

“It was you, and not your sister, I find, that my brother had the pleasure of being acquainted with, when he was in this country.”

Anne hoped she had outlived the age of blushing; but the age of emotion she certainly had not.

“Perhaps you may not have heard that he is married?” added Mrs Croft.

Of course, this turns out to be Captain Wentworth’s brother who used to live in their neighborhood, and the man the Captain was visiting when he and Anne fell in love. It could be a cheap ploy, but it works, and my heart is in my mouth along with Anne’s.

Another thing I love about Austen especially in this novel—her practical, honest narrative voice. Here’s how she describes the loss of the youngest of the Musgrove sons, Richard.

The real circumstances of this pathetic piece of family history were, that the Musgroves had had the ill fortune of a very troublesome, hopeless son; and the good fortune to lose him before he reached his twentieth year; that he had been sent to sea because he was stupid and unmanageable on shore; that he had been very little cared for at any time by his family, though quite as much as he deserved; seldom heard of, and scarcely at all regretted, when the intelligence of his death abroad had worked its way to Uppercross, two years before.

So blunt and honest in a way you don’t expect the well-mannered to be, and no one (seemingly) has better manners than Jane Austen. J and I were just discussing why Pride and Prejudice has received far and away the best adaptation (the BBC mini), and he proposed it’s because Austen’s narrative voice is so significant to the enjoyment of her novels, and that the narrative voice in P&P is so close to Elizabeth Bennet’s voice you can have her believably deliver the famous opening line about a man of large fortune and other tidbits from the narration. It feels so natural and the best of Austen remains. What more can you want? The narrative voice of Persuasion is so wonderfully blunt and subtle all at once, without the restrictions Anne feels since she is such a decent, unassuming woman. (Crazy idea—work out this theory some more and write about it in detail.)

And that’s all for now, but I’m so excited because Captain Wentworth is coming!!!!!

~S

 

The Persuasion Project: Chapters 4 and 5

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CE Brock illustration from mollands.net.

The Persuasion Live Read finally continues! When last we saw Anne and her family in Chapter 3, the Elliots were retrenching, letting their home to people connected to the mysterious Captain Wentworth from Anne’s past. What could possibly happen next?! Well, let us read.

Chapter 4
He was, at that time, a remarkably fine young man, with a great deal of intelligence, spirit, and brilliancy; and Anne an extremely pretty girl, with gentleness, modesty, taste, and feeling. Half the sum of attraction, on either side, might have been enough, for he had nothing to do, and she had hardly anybody to love; but the encounter of such lavish recommendations could not fail. They were gradually acquainted, and when acquainted, rapidly and deeply in love. It would be difficult to say which had seen highest perfection in the other, or which had been the happiest: she, in receiving his declarations and proposals, or he in having them accepted.

How lovely is that? Granted, the reader is immediately inclined to swoon over these two given how our sympathetic heroine feels about him, but Austen in just a few sentences wonderfully describes the blossoming of true love. Bless her. This, of course, makes it even more painful as the reader learns how Lady Russell, not entirely in the wrong, convinced Anne to break her engagement to the unpromising Captain Wentworth.

But we soon learn that Captain Wentworth was actually as promising as he claimed he would be—rising in rank in the navy and making his fortune. Anne, I think showing a wonderful maturity and realism, doesn’t blame Lady Russell or herself for acting as she did when she broke her engagement to him, and yet, she would not advise a young woman in the same position to act in the same manner. It’s a fantastic, Austen-y realization, followed by that equally lovely self-delusion Austen excels at, as Anne thinks she will be able to meet Captain Wentworth’s sister and brother-in-law when they take the house with no awkwardness. Poor girl.

Chapter 5
So, Admiral Cross (that is Captain Wentworth’s brother-in-law) comes to terms with Sir Walter to move into Kellynch Hall. Sir Walter, Elizabeth, and Anne are all to move to Bath within the month, but Anne’s other sister, Mary, is ill and wants Anne to stay with her and her family just a few miles from Kellynch Hall. I think this exchange sums up how Anne is truly the only decent member of the family:

“I cannot possibly do without Anne,” was Mary’s reasoning; and Elizabeth’s reply was, “Then I am sure Anne had better stay, for nobody will want her in Bath.”

So, Sir Walter, Elizabeth, and Elizabeth’s companion, Mrs. Clay, depart. Anne stays with Lady Russell for a time before venturing to Uppercross Cottage to stay with Mary, one of Austen’s great “invalids.” In addition to Mary, the reader is introduced to her in-laws, the Musgroves, the table being set incrementally for the story about to unfold in earnest.

Hopefully I’ll be more regular in my live read, especially when I finish up The Count of Monte Cristo. In the meantime, think of Rupert Penry Jones.

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Original from PBS.

~S

 

The Persuasion Project: Chapters 2 and 3

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CE Brock illustration for Persuasion from mollands.net.

Today is a big day for us. This afternoon we will be meeting up with our local NaNoWriMo group to have the first planning session of the year, discussing write-ins and other events for the month of November. It will be great to see everyone again, although, now that I think of it, this past year we had more participation in the two Camp NaNo sessions than we often do, so it hasn’t necessarily been a year since we’ve seen most of these lovely folks.

J is busy outlining and planning for November, and so am I, but I have to say it’s going slower than I would like. This year I’m tackling historical fiction for the first time, and the research may be the death of me. Last night I lost about an hour looking for the answer to a question that I eventually realized wasn’t even important. And I have a strong suspicion it won’t be the last time that happens. At any rate, it’s really made me appreciate the writers of historical fiction, and that’s something.

But before we head off to meet our friends, I wanted to take a quick look at two more chapters of Persuasion. In Chapter 2 it is decided with Lady Russell’s help that the Elliot family must “retrench,” a fancy term for becoming responsible grownups when it comes to money. In Chapter 3 it looks like they have a plan—move to Bath, which is cheaper, while letting their home, Kellynch Hall, most likely to a naval officer. We leave the chapter with a fair assurance Admiral Croft will soon be living in Kellynch, and that through his wife, he has some sort of powerful connection to Anne. (Oh what could it be?!)

Here are the quick jottings I made while reading.

Chapter 2
Lady Russell is Emma Woodhouse 20 years later, if not for the chastening experience of meddling with Harriet Smith and the guiding hand of Mr. Knightley. Such a well-meaning snob.

I feel for Anne, and I like her very much, but does she not know her father and sister? Of course they would never agree to complete austerity measures as their retrenchment plan. And they would definitely never stay in their neighborhood in a smaller house. It’s only Chapter 2 and even I know that about Sir Walter and Elizabeth. So, what does this say about Anne? What does it say about Austen as a storyteller?

Lady Russell likes Bath and the idea of the Elliot family moving there. (Which happens to be in direct opposition to Anne’s wishes.) This is surely our first sign that while we were initially disposed to Lady Russell, she is not without fault. Perhaps this is the point of making Anne a little clueless about what her father and sister are willing to do. This way we are not offended when Lady Russell disregards Anne’s wishes on moving to Bath, since we know Anne has been wrong before about the retrenchment.

Chapter 3
Sir Walter’s vanity is hilarious. He doesn’t want to let his house to a sailor because he will have a tan? It’s this sort of thinking that got you into this mess in the first place.

Why does Anne know the naval lists? Who’s who and where they are stationed? Hmm.

“You mean Mr. Wentworth, I suppose?” said Anne. meep

This chapter has been a nice, subtle build in the mystery of who is Anne Elliot. Especially the way the chapter is left, Anne agitated: “A few months more, and he, perhaps, may be walking here.” Who is he? What does he mean to her? (Of course, having read the novel before, I know it’s Captain Wentworth, love of her life. Sigh!)

~S

The Persuasion Project

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Original title page of Persuasion, published posthumously along with Northanger Abbey.

Happy bloggiversary to us! Well, actually, our two year anniversary is this coming Thursday, but we figure it’s best to celebrate now. Rather than do a recap of the past year as we did for our first bloggiversary, we’re using the occasion to launch a new series—a live reread of Jane Austen’s Persuasion.

So, why Persuasion? It not my favorite Jane Austen (that would be Emma) or J’s favorite (that would be Pride and Prejudice), but Persuasion has been on my mind a lot lately as it seems to keep popping up on my social media. Also, it’s a brilliant novel, which receives less love that the two mentioned above, and that’s just not right. Although, I have often found that the people who love this book, really love it.

Now, the idea of this live reread is that one of us will read a chapter (or two? we’ll see) of Persuasion and blog our reaction in as real time as it’s possible to do while reading. Or we’ll do all of our thoughts at the end of a chapter. Whatever strikes as us interesting at the moment. We’ll try not to neglect this reread and post a little something at least once a month, but we don’t want to neglect other topics, especially with NaNoWriMo just around the corner.

And here goes nothing. My thoughts on Chapter 1 of Persuasion.

 
Chapter 1

Sir Walter Elliot, of Kellynch Hall, in Somersetshire, was a man who, for his own amusement, never took up any book but the Baronetage; there he found occupation for an idle hour, and consolation in a distressed one; there his faculties were roused into admiration and respect, by contemplating the limited remnant of the earliest patents; there any unwelcome sensations, arising from domestic affairs changed naturally into pity and contempt as he turned over the almost endless creations of the last century; and there, if every other leaf were powerless, he could read his own history with an interest which never failed.

Not what usually comes to mind when thinking about the first sentence of a Jane Austen novel. It doesn’t have the sly humor of Pride and Prejudice or tell us something apt and amusing about our heroine, a la Emma and Northanger Abbey. No, it’s setting up the family at the center of the story, much like Sense and Sensibility and Mansfield Park, Austen’s two least novels. Yet, it’s the right opening for this book. The tone of Persuasion is more subtle and somber than Austen’s others, and as much as the reader grows to adore Anne Elliot, opening with someone so modest and unassuming would feel exactly wrong.

For several paragraphs, Austen continues on with Sir Walter, and every word makes the reader like him less. It’s a bold way to open a book.

Following the introduction of Sir Walter, we hear about his deceased wife and her best friend, Lady Russell. Then Austen mentions Sir Walter’s oldest, and favorite daughter, Elizabeth, as well as the youngest daughter, Mary. Only then does the reader finally meet Anne. But why should we have met her sooner? “[S]he was only Anne.” If you haven’t read the novel before or know anything about it, you might not even realize this is the introduction to the novel’s heroine.

That is until the next paragraph. Austen makes the reader think highly of the dead mother, so that as soon as her best friend sees a likeness to the deceased in Anne, the reader knows this will be a character we care about. And yet, all we get here is this single paragraph, before Austen sets off on Elizabeth and the Mr. Elliot who shall inherit, since Sir Walter has no son.

The chapter ends with a discussion of the Elliot family’s financial problems, and the reader still learns no more about Anne. But why should we worry about her? She “had been a very pretty girl, but her bloom had vanished early; and as even in its height, her father had found little to admire in her, (so totally different were her delicate features and mild dark eyes from his own), there could be nothing in them, now that she was faded and thin, to excite his esteem.” Actually, how much more does this tell us about Sir Walter than Anne? Come to think of it, given how vain and unlikable he is, do we even believe him? Perhaps Anne has her own sort of loveliness. Whatever the answer, it’s a fascinating way to begin a novel, not even allowing the reader to be certain of what few “facts” we know about the heroine.

~S