The Long Count

sesame-street-count

1,243, count them, 1,243 pages!  Mwahaha!

It’s Sunday again, and we almost forgot to blog. S has been working on a rather important project for work that we won’t discuss here. I’ve been working a little on some reference works for the Myrciaverse. Also, we made a pot roast for supper, and it was delicious.

Over the weekend we finished The Count of Monte Cristo for S’s book club. It’s the second time I’ve read it, and it’s easy to forget just how incredibly long it is. How long is it? Well, it’s so long that the book club is doing War and Peace this summer, and thanks to The Count of Monte Cristo, War and Peace will only be the second-longest book we’re reading this year. That’s how long it is. S may post her thoughts on it sometime, but here’s my super-quick review.

It’s very good, and if you’ve got a few months free, I would highly recommend it. However, we had a few issues with it. For one thing, Dumas really drags the story out. There are long books that feel shorter than they are, like War and Peace. And for the most part, The Count of Monte Cristo is one of those. It reads pretty quickly. But there are times, like the chapters where Luigi Vampa, the Roman bandit, is introduced, that take up far, far more space than they really need to.

Then there are problems with the story itself. The count’s relationship with Haydée, his Greek slave girl, seems awfully forced. The count ends up with her because reasons, basically. One gets the sense that Dumas planned it that way, and forgot to show their relationship developing believably over the course of the story. As I remarked to S right after we reached the end, Haydée is the Ginny Weasley of the book.

As for the count himself, the fact that he decides that revenge is bad at the end comes out of pretty much nowhere. And the way he treats Maximilien Morrel at the end—refusing to come right out and say that Maximilien’s sweetheart, Valentine de Villefort, is still alive—is just cruel. When Maximilien and Valentine are reunited, they both act absurdly grateful to the count, when any normal person in their place would smack the guy in the face.

But even so, it was a good book. Good enough to read twice, in fact.

J

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