The Persuasion Project: Chapters 2 and 3

persuasion-drawing

CE Brock illustration for Persuasion from mollands.net.

Today is a big day for us. This afternoon we will be meeting up with our local NaNoWriMo group to have the first planning session of the year, discussing write-ins and other events for the month of November. It will be great to see everyone again, although, now that I think of it, this past year we had more participation in the two Camp NaNo sessions than we often do, so it hasn’t necessarily been a year since we’ve seen most of these lovely folks.

J is busy outlining and planning for November, and so am I, but I have to say it’s going slower than I would like. This year I’m tackling historical fiction for the first time, and the research may be the death of me. Last night I lost about an hour looking for the answer to a question that I eventually realized wasn’t even important. And I have a strong suspicion it won’t be the last time that happens. At any rate, it’s really made me appreciate the writers of historical fiction, and that’s something.

But before we head off to meet our friends, I wanted to take a quick look at two more chapters of Persuasion. In Chapter 2 it is decided with Lady Russell’s help that the Elliot family must “retrench,” a fancy term for becoming responsible grownups when it comes to money. In Chapter 3 it looks like they have a plan—move to Bath, which is cheaper, while letting their home, Kellynch Hall, most likely to a naval officer. We leave the chapter with a fair assurance Admiral Croft will soon be living in Kellynch, and that through his wife, he has some sort of powerful connection to Anne. (Oh what could it be?!)

Here are the quick jottings I made while reading.

Chapter 2
Lady Russell is Emma Woodhouse 20 years later, if not for the chastening experience of meddling with Harriet Smith and the guiding hand of Mr. Knightley. Such a well-meaning snob.

I feel for Anne, and I like her very much, but does she not know her father and sister? Of course they would never agree to complete austerity measures as their retrenchment plan. And they would definitely never stay in their neighborhood in a smaller house. It’s only Chapter 2 and even I know that about Sir Walter and Elizabeth. So, what does this say about Anne? What does it say about Austen as a storyteller?

Lady Russell likes Bath and the idea of the Elliot family moving there. (Which happens to be in direct opposition to Anne’s wishes.) This is surely our first sign that while we were initially disposed to Lady Russell, she is not without fault. Perhaps this is the point of making Anne a little clueless about what her father and sister are willing to do. This way we are not offended when Lady Russell disregards Anne’s wishes on moving to Bath, since we know Anne has been wrong before about the retrenchment.

Chapter 3
Sir Walter’s vanity is hilarious. He doesn’t want to let his house to a sailor because he will have a tan? It’s this sort of thinking that got you into this mess in the first place.

Why does Anne know the naval lists? Who’s who and where they are stationed? Hmm.

“You mean Mr. Wentworth, I suppose?” said Anne. meep

This chapter has been a nice, subtle build in the mystery of who is Anne Elliot. Especially the way the chapter is left, Anne agitated: “A few months more, and he, perhaps, may be walking here.” Who is he? What does he mean to her? (Of course, having read the novel before, I know it’s Captain Wentworth, love of her life. Sigh!)

~S

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